Manganese

Hi, I am Manganese. I am an element discovered in 1774 by the Swedish chemist

Johan Gottlieb Gahn. My symbol was devised, coincidentally, by taking the first
and third letters in the word manganese. My atomic number is 25, my atomic mass
is 54.938, and my density is 7.2. I melt at 1245º C and then in turn I boil at

1962º C. A fact about my ionization energy currently escapes me, but I do have
some uses and interesting facts in the rest of the paper. I am used as an
antioxidant nutrient, I activate important enzymes that are needed in digestion,
and I am the 12th most abundant element in the earth’s crust. And now I will
switch into a third person perspective because I am bored of talking in the
first. Manganese is a silvery, brittle metallic element that is used to
strengthen alloys with armor. Manganese metal corrodes in moist air and
dissolves in acid. Pure manganese can be obtained by electrolyzing manganese
sulfate or by igniting pyrolusite. The free state of the metal only occurs in
meteors, but it is found in ores all over the earth, predominantly in Ukraine,

Georgia, and South Africa. The alloys which are made with manganese are usually
used in steelmaking, are ferromanganese, and spiegeleisen. Manganese dioxide (pyrolusite)
is used in dry-cell batteries, paint, varnish oils, coloring glass, ceramics,
and in preparing chlorine and iodine. Other forms of manganese are used as
oxidizers, disinfectants, and as a depolarizer.