Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha

Paddy Clarke
Paddy Clarke
Paddy Clarke \'Paddy Clarke, Ha Ha Ha\' has no authorial presence at all. Yet the reader gains a richer understanding of Paddy\'s situation than he, or any ten year old child, could ever have. How does Roddy Doyle achieve this with regard to Paddy\'s parent\'s break up? One of the first and most relevant passages in the book is when Patrick wakes up and hears the television and from that knows that his parents are still awake. He stays on the stairs and listens to \'Ma\' and \'Da\' arguing in t
Paddy Clarke
Paddy Clarke
Paddy Clarke The novel Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha has no authorial presence at all, yet the reader gains a richer understanding of the situation than Paddy – or any other 10-year old – could ever have. With regard to the parent’s break up, how does Doyle achieve this? There are many factors which suggest how Doyle has succeeded in creating a \'triangular relationship\' between himself the reader and the narrator – Paddy Clarke – so that the reader has a greater awareness of the predicament that Padd